Difference between revisions of "Toomes, Crossroads Brewery"

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'''William Toomes''', ''Stonehenge Inn, 2 Stonehenge Road, Durrington, Wiltshire''
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[[File:WiltsDurringtonToomes.jpg|thumb|Ordnance Survey extract from 1878. Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland (http://maps.nls.uk/index.html)]]
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[[File:DurringtonToomes2007aa_StonehengeInn_BHK_Sep07.jpg|thumb|Photo BHK 2007]]
  
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<big>'''William and Lewis Toomes''', ''Stonehenge Inn, 2 Stonehenge Road, Durrington, Wiltshire''</big>
  
The Stonehenge inn incorporated the Crossroads brewery from about 1875.
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The Stonehenge Inn incorporated the Crossroads Brewery from about 1875. In about 1917 it was bought by Portsmouth (later Portsmouth & Brighton) United Breweries, who rebuilt the pub.
  
In about 1917 it was bought by Portsmouth (later Portsmouth & Brighton) United Breweries, which had a depot there until about 1981.
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[[Portsmouth & Brighton United Breweries Ltd|Portsmouth & Brighton United]] had a depot there until about 1981. The brewery building is still there and in the wall in white tiles (not painted) it says 'PORTSMOUTH UNITED BREWERIES LTD'.
  
[[File:WiltsDurringtonToomes.jpg|400px]]
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''From https://history.wiltshire.gov.uk:''
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''With an eye to the possibilities of early tourism the Stonehenge Inn was opened at the junction of the Upavon to Amesbury and Bulford to Shrewton roads. William Toomes was a beer retailer here originally but by 1889 Lewis Toomes had built the Stonehenge Inn and advertised it as a posting house with its own brewery and livery and bait stables. Its success was possibly one of the reasons for the closure of the Nag's Head between 1889 and 1895 although the licensee had been a widow whose son took over the Plough. An indication of changing times to come saw the closure of Durrington Mill in the 1880's and the establishment of racehorse training at Durrington House, that continued into the 20th century.''
  
'''Ordnance Survey 1878'''
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'''The pub and brewery in March 2011. Photos Andy Hooker:'''
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<gallery>
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File:WiltsDurringtonToomes3_Mar11_AHooker.jpg
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File:WiltsDurringtonToomes2_Mar11_AHooker.jpg
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File:WiltsDurringtonToomes1_Mar11_AHooker.jpg
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</gallery>
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Sources:
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* https://history.wiltshire.gov.uk
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* http://www.british-history.ac.uk
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[[Category:Wiltshire]]

Latest revision as of 12:52, 16 November 2020

Ordnance Survey extract from 1878. Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland (http://maps.nls.uk/index.html)
Photo BHK 2007

William and Lewis Toomes, Stonehenge Inn, 2 Stonehenge Road, Durrington, Wiltshire

The Stonehenge Inn incorporated the Crossroads Brewery from about 1875. In about 1917 it was bought by Portsmouth (later Portsmouth & Brighton) United Breweries, who rebuilt the pub.

Portsmouth & Brighton United had a depot there until about 1981. The brewery building is still there and in the wall in white tiles (not painted) it says 'PORTSMOUTH UNITED BREWERIES LTD'.

From https://history.wiltshire.gov.uk: With an eye to the possibilities of early tourism the Stonehenge Inn was opened at the junction of the Upavon to Amesbury and Bulford to Shrewton roads. William Toomes was a beer retailer here originally but by 1889 Lewis Toomes had built the Stonehenge Inn and advertised it as a posting house with its own brewery and livery and bait stables. Its success was possibly one of the reasons for the closure of the Nag's Head between 1889 and 1895 although the licensee had been a widow whose son took over the Plough. An indication of changing times to come saw the closure of Durrington Mill in the 1880's and the establishment of racehorse training at Durrington House, that continued into the 20th century.


The pub and brewery in March 2011. Photos Andy Hooker:

Sources: