Hugh Wilson

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Wilson Kegworth.jpg

Hugh Wilson, Steam Brewery, Derby Road, Kegworth, Leicestershire.

By 1870, the Steam Brewery on Derby Road was being operated by the Barrow Brothers.

However, in 1875, the brewery was trading as Peter Sullins & Co, with a depot at 5 Dover Street, Leicester. At the time, they also seem to be have been listed for Castle Donington, but this may have been another depot.

In 1882, GH Colmore of Kegworth was mentioned as a brewer and shareholder in the Springwell Brewery Co. Ltd, Nottingham. This was wound up in 1884 and on 2nd January 1885, the brewery and the other property were sold for £2,500 to Hugh Mark Wilson. However, in 1890, when he was a shareholder in Marstons, Wilson was only described as a beer merchant and brewing seems to have ceased. In 1895, the site seems to have become a depot for Marstons, when Wilson was described as the district manager.

Nevertheless, Hugh Wilson was still listed as brewing at what had become the Springs Well or Springwell Brewery until c.1900.

At some point, John Nicholls Forsell was using the premises as the Springwell Mineral Water Works, until c.1912. The building was then used as a glue and then a hosiery factory, which later burnt down in the 1920s. The brewer’s house is still standing at No 67.

Brewer's house still standing.

Mike Brown writes:-

In 1826-35, Samuel Barrow was running the Flying Horse in Kegworth. Then in 1848, Richard Barrow was shown as a beer retailer, probably at the Horse and Groom which he ran in 1855, whilst Mrs Sarah Barrow was running the Flying Horse. By 1870, the Steam Brewery on Derby Road was being operated by the Barrow Brothers - East India pale and other ales, with a capacity of around 50 quarters per week. John Barrow was also a maltster at Diseworth.

However, in 1875, the brewery was trading as Peter Sullins & Company, with a depot at 5 Dover Street, Leicester, run by a William Hollis. At the time, they also seem to be have been listed for Castle Donington, but this may have been another depot.

Between 1875 and 1884, Sullins & Sons, were shown as a large brewers. In 1877, the business was listed as Peter Sullins and Son, but in 1880 Peter Sullins junior of Kegworth was in liquidation (Brewers’ Journal p161) and the following year only the father was listed.

They only had a small estate, of which the following have been identified:-

  • Prince of Wales, Shepshed
  • Rose & Crown, Wymeswold
  • Oddfellows, Kegworth
  • Cross Keys, Kegworth

In 1882, GH Colmore of Kegworth was mentioned in the Brewers’ Journal as a brewer and shareholder in the Springwell’s Brewery Company Ltd. This was registered on 20th March, worth £10,000 in £10 shares, with the initial subscribers being:-

  • William Nall, Southport - Brewer
  • William Nall, Manchester - Carrier
  • WR Talmer, London - Barrister
  • J Widdowson, Hucknall - Maltster
  • A Cleaver, Nottingham - Bleacher
  • Francis Frederick Cleaver, Nottingham Lace - dealer

The registered offices were at 6 Thurland Street, Nottingham. The brewery was connected with Springwell House, and the property was mortgaged to the Hemsley family.

In 1884, George Hartridge was listed as the brewing manager at the Springwells Brewery. Although a William Yeomans living in Kegworth was shown as a brewery traveller, he was more likely to have been working for the Burton concern with which his family was involved. However, at an Extraordinary General Meeting on 25th October 1884 it was decided that the business should be wound up and Henry Edward Hubbart of Nottingham was appointed as the liquidator.

On 2nd January 1885, the brewery and the other property were sold for £2,500 to Hugh Mark Wilson. However, in 1890, when he was a shareholder in Marstons, Wilson was only described as a beer merchant and brewing seems to have ceased. In the same year he conveyed to Marstons for £2,700:-

  • Oddfellows (previously New Inn) Packington Hill, Kegworth
  • Anchor Inn, Sutton Bonnington
  • Off-Licence, Moor Lane/ Russell Street, Kegworth

Wilson was described as an ale and porter dealer. The census for the following year, states that he was a British subject, aged 35, born in Germany. Peter Sullins was living in retirement on Derby Road.

In 1894, Hugh Mark Wilson was a stout bottler and brewery agent in the High Street. In 1895, the site seems to have become a depot for Marstons, when Wilson was described as the district manager. Nevertheless, Hugh Wilson (F2306) was still listed as brewing at what had become the Springs Well or Springwell Brewery until around 1900.

At some point, John Nicholls Forsell was using the brewery premises as the Springwell Mineral Water Works, until around 1912, when it passed to his wife. The building was then used as a glue and then a hosiery factory, which later burnt down in the 1920s.

However, the brewer’s house is still standing at No 67.